All posts filed under: Reviews

NIGHTSCAPES at Longwood Gardens or, Thinking About the Ways We Use Landscape (Again)

Something interesting happened this weekend. I watched landscapes transform in front of my eyes. I witnessed trees alter their purpose to enfold new meanings. I visited Longwood Gardens’ Nightscape, an artistically-driven exhibit that interlaces light and color with the foliage after dark. [Watch the Nightscapes trailer] During the show (which in July begins at 9:30 P.M., August at 9:00 P.M. and September at 8:30 P.M.), the visitor can start at one of four sites on the grounds: the large lake on the east end, the flower garden walk, the topiaries in the center, or the conservatory on the west side of the park. In total, there are nine separate viewing locations. Longwood Gardens is located in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, a short drive from Philadelphia. After a long, partially sunny/somewhat drizzly day of trekking through meadows, exploring coniferous groves, and peering into the faces of blossoms, we relaxed a bit at the outdoor beer garden, specifically established for the run of the exhibit. Cold drinks in hand and bluegrass in the air, we were excited and …

50 Years After Friedan, A Fresh Look into “Nuclear Age” (Women) Scholars

Review: College Women in the Nuclear Age: Cultural Literacy and Female Identity, 1940-1960 by Babette Faehmel (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2013) In search of a good read, I stumbled upon Babette Faehmel’s new publication College Women in the Nuclear Age: Cultural Literacy and Female Identity, 1940-1960 and was thrilled to discover a text that took on an issue in America’s history that I feel has been overlooked in recent years: the lives of collegiate women during World War II and Cold War. Possibly due to current popular obsession with retro culture (think of HBO’s Mad Men or clothing stores like Mod Cloth) this compelling study eases its way into both pleasure-reading and academic conversation. It is equally a quick, enjoyable read and thought-provoking inquiry that takes its place among women’s studies classics by Barbara Solomon, Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz and Linda Eisenmann. Faehmel’s revisionist framework relies on Betty Friedan’s Feminine Mystique, published exactly fifty years ago in 1963, but acknowledges that she is not the first to do so. Faehmel seeks to bring forth …